Archangel Michael Speaks!

dcm313:

Archangel Michael Speaks! is a compilation of information brought forth during the massive energy shifts that occurred in 2012. It is a practical guide to facilitate understanding of the new energy consciousness that is sweeping the planet since that time. Included are exercises that will help the reader clear away old energy patterns and begin assimilating and integrating this new energy consciousness into their everyday lives. Archangel Michael Speaks! is a must read for those seeking deeper knowledge and understanding of the energy that is fueling the exciting times in which we live.

Check out this collection of channeled material, via my friend and healer. Arch Angel Michael has provided me guidance and practices for self healing.

(via dcm313)

arch angel michael channel divine guidance love healing

"I fell in love with her courage, her sincerity, and her flaming self respect. And it’s these things I’d believe in, even if the whole world indulged in wild suspicions that she wasn’t all she should be. I love her and it is the beginning of everything."
-

— F. Scott Fitzgerald (via realizes)

Today, this is for Mary Magdalene

(via islaissa)

"The Magdalene, most of all, is the model I like to follow. That boldness of hers, which be so amazing if it weren’t the boldness of a lover, won the heart of Jesus, and how it fascinates mine!"
- St. Therese of Lisieux (via sermoveritas)

(via islaissa)

"

Next comes the Lancelot and Guinevere story called the Knight of the Cart. The beauty of it is that Arthur recognizes that Lancelot and Guinevere are in love, and he understands what love is, he values and appreciates it.

…Guinevere has been abducted. Lancelot starts out to recover her, but he rides his horse to death. There he is, walking along in a heavy suit of armor and not getting anywhere fast, when a cart roles up slowly and passes him.

It would be utterly dishonorable for a knight in his armor to ride in a cart, becasue carts were used for carrying criminals to execution, carrying manure, carrying animals, and all sorts of things. No knight would ride in a cart.

When the cart passes Lancelot, however, he thinks, “If I were in that, I’d get to Guinevere faster. But honor…”

For three steps he hesitates—and then gets in the cart, his first trial of honor against love.

One of the trials he has to endure before getting to Guinevere is a motif known as the Trial of the Perilous Bed. The knight in full armor comes into a naked marble room. In the middle of it is a bed on rollers. The adventure is to rest quietly on that bed.

So Lancelot approaches the bed and the bed shies away. He approaches it again, but again the bed shies away. Finally, he has to make a running jump in full armor with shield and everything else and land on that bed. He achieves this—but as soon as he hits the bed, it starts bucking around like a western bronco, bumping against the walls and everything else. When it finally settles down, a lion comes in. Well, Lancelot manages to take care of the lion, but he is sorely injured.

Now the ladies of the castle come down, wondering what has happened to the hero down here. They revive him, and then he goes on to the next adventure.

My friend Heinrich Zimmer years ago asked , “What is the meaning of the perilous bed? What can that possibly be?” And I think he came up with the right answer. He said, “It is metaphorical of the male experience of the female temperament. You can’t understand what the hell’s going on there,” as he said, “but be patient and it will settle down and all the joys of beautiful womanhood will be yours.”

I had an experience with the perilous bed when I was doing a book on Hindu art—editing one of Zimmer’s unfinished books after he had died—and I had collected all the pictures I needed except three or four.

Now, I had known Ananda K. Coomaraswamy, who was at that time the leading authority on these matters, but he had just died. I knew that the pictures that I wanted were in his collection up in Boston and that his widow would have them. So I phoned her up and asked if I had come up to look through the doctor’s collection to find these three pictures that I needed.

It was a very hot day in Boston, but I thought it would take me only about a half hour to go through these files.

"Oh," she said, "come on up." So I went up. "Joe, here’s the room, there are the files."

"I’d just opened the shelves when in she came and said, "So, Joe, it’s kind of hot, don’t you think you want a lemonade or something like that?"

"Okay." I didn’t at all but didn’t want to appear rude.

So we had lemonade and had a nice long talk, and then she went off an I was just about getting into it again when it was dinnertime. So off we go to dinner and again we talked. I come back again, I was poking around in the files, when she said, “You know, Joe, it’d be perfectly all right, you can sleep on the couch over there, really, it’d be perfectly all right.”

I said to myself, “This is the perilous bed, and I’m going to hang on here.”

Three days. The pictures are in the book, I got them, but I tell you, that was the Trial of the Perilous Bed.

Lancelot’s next trial is what’s called the Sword Bridge. This is an archetypal motif in many mythologies from the Hindus to the Eskimo. A chasm has to be crossed on a sword bridge, and the hero is to go across that bridge. The meaning of this in troubadour terms is that, when you’re following the way of Amor instead of the way of society, you are following what’s known as the Left-Hand Path.

The Right-Hand Path is the path that stays inside the rules, that keeps to the social norms. The Left-Hand Path, on the other hand, is the way of great danger and the way of passion, and there’s nothing more destructive to a life course than passion. This is the lesson: on the way of the Sword Bridge you must keep your mind on Amor, not passion, or the slightest step off or the slightest quiver of fear will throw you into a torrent that will carry you all way down. This is the lesson of the Left-Hand Path and of Amor.

Lancelot crosses the Sword Bridge, overthrows the guards of the castle where Guinevere is being imprisoned, and comes to receive the greeting of his queen.

She is cold as ice.

Why?

He hesitates for three days before getting on that cart.

The rules of love, they really are severe. If you’re giving up everything for something, then give up everything for something and stay with it with your mind on where you’re going.

These are wonderful lessons for people who are off on the Left-Hand Path—and that’s the path to be on if you want to have a spiritual instead of a nice sociological life.

"
- Joseph Campbell, Goddesses

joseph campbell goddesses truth troubadour spiritual awakening lancelot quinevere amor love life passion myth mythology legend knight medieval fairy tail europe france

"People say that what we’re all seeking is a meaning for life. I don’t think that’s what were really seeking. I think that what we’re seeking is an experience of being alive, so that our life experiences on the purely physical plane will have resonances within our own innermost being and reality, so that we actually feel the rapture of being alive."
- Joseph Campbell (via livingladolcevitanyc)
"To know love without grasping. To know beauty without wishing ownership. To touch the essence of life within the display of forms is the purpose and meaning of human life."
- Traktung Rinpoche (via lazyyogi)

elespiritusantoamen:

The rulers took counsel with one another and said, “Come, let us cause a deep sleep to fall upon Adam.” And he slept. – Now the deep sleep that they “caused to fall upon him, and he slept” is Ignorance. – They opened his side like a living woman. And they built up his side with some flesh in place of her, and Adam came to be endowed only with soul.

And the spirit-endowed woman came to him and spoke with him, saying, “Arise, Adam.” And when he saw her, he said, “It is you who have given me life; you will be called ‘mother of the living’. – For it is she who is my mother. It is she who is the physician, and the woman, and she who has given birth.”

-Hypostasis of The Archons

(via hypgnosis-metaphoric)


 THE NORSE EARTH GODDESS, Erda, was believed to live in a cave within the earth’s deepest recesses, which was set next to the roots of Yggdrasil, the vast World Tree. The earth was thought to revolve on its axis around Yggdrasil, whose massive limbs sustained and connected all of life. Yggdrasil was watered by Erda’s plentiful fountain of wisdom. This pure source of water enabled the tree’s tallest branches to reach the heavens,  and its widest branches to give shade to all.
Erda’s powers were as encompassing as Yggdrasil’s leafy span—indeed, the goddess and her magical fountain were often invoked by those in need of her far-reaching wisdom. Others believed Erda could bend the inexorable powers of fate, over which she ruled. One myth tells how the Norse god Odin gave up one of his eyes for the privilege of drinking from Erda’s fountain; his quest for knowledge was worth more to him than the pedestrian gift of eyesight.
Another story claims that Erda is the oldest goddess of the three Norns, a trio of sister goddesses associated with the past, present, and future. They were believed to help mothers as they gave birth, and ruled over a person’s unchangeable destiny. 
 DIVINING FATE
Because of Erda’s association with fate, the Norse believed there was a clear correlation between the goddess and the art of divination, a valued part of pre-Christian Scandinavian society. It may be hard to imagine today, but at that time, every home was open to seeresses—female practitioners of the art of divination, who were believed to receive help from the spirit world. The predictions presented by the seeress often came in the form of mysterious poems obtained by the use of runes, or other oracles whose messages she was skilled in deciphering.
The seeress made her runes from bone or wood strips cut from a nut-bearing tree, upon which potent symbols were carved or painted. In a way, by creating runes from a tree, the seeress was drawing from that same fountain of wisdom Erda used to nurture Yggdrasil and, consequently, invoking the goddess herself.
The Norse also turned to the earth itself for guidance. They used many aspects of it as oracles—animals, birds, the sky, even the ocean—believing that  the observation of these things could bring divine answers to questions posed. Horses in particular were considered to be the confidants of the gods and goddesses, able to reveal heaven’s will to sensitive humans. A horse’s calm movements could promise a peaceful solution to the questions posed; other movements mirrored other outcomes.
Using natural forms as oracles reminds us that the earth can give us the answers we need to our most urgent and primal queries. By using these forms of divinations, the Norse were able to receive wisdom directly from Erda, Mother Earth. 
~ The Book of Goddesses: A Celebration of the Divine Feminine 

 THE NORSE EARTH GODDESS, Erda, was believed to live in a cave within the earth’s deepest recesses, which was set next to the roots of Yggdrasil, the vast World Tree. The earth was thought to revolve on its axis around Yggdrasil, whose massive limbs sustained and connected all of life. Yggdrasil was watered by Erda’s plentiful fountain of wisdom. This pure source of water enabled the tree’s tallest branches to reach the heavens,  and its widest branches to give shade to all.

Erda’s powers were as encompassing as Yggdrasil’s leafy span—indeed, the goddess and her magical fountain were often invoked by those in need of her far-reaching wisdom. Others believed Erda could bend the inexorable powers of fate, over which she ruled. One myth tells how the Norse god Odin gave up one of his eyes for the privilege of drinking from Erda’s fountain; his quest for knowledge was worth more to him than the pedestrian gift of eyesight.

Another story claims that Erda is the oldest goddess of the three Norns, a trio of sister goddesses associated with the past, present, and future. They were believed to help mothers as they gave birth, and ruled over a person’s unchangeable destiny. 

 DIVINING FATE

Because of Erda’s association with fate, the Norse believed there was a clear correlation between the goddess and the art of divination, a valued part of pre-Christian Scandinavian society. It may be hard to imagine today, but at that time, every home was open to seeresses—female practitioners of the art of divination, who were believed to receive help from the spirit world. The predictions presented by the seeress often came in the form of mysterious poems obtained by the use of runes, or other oracles whose messages she was skilled in deciphering.

The seeress made her runes from bone or wood strips cut from a nut-bearing tree, upon which potent symbols were carved or painted. In a way, by creating runes from a tree, the seeress was drawing from that same fountain of wisdom Erda used to nurture Yggdrasil and, consequently, invoking the goddess herself.

The Norse also turned to the earth itself for guidance. They used many aspects of it as oracles—animals, birds, the sky, even the ocean—believing that  the observation of these things could bring divine answers to questions posed. Horses in particular were considered to be the confidants of the gods and goddesses, able to reveal heaven’s will to sensitive humans. A horse’s calm movements could promise a peaceful solution to the questions posed; other movements mirrored other outcomes.

Using natural forms as oracles reminds us that the earth can give us the answers we need to our most urgent and primal queries. By using these forms of divinations, the Norse were able to receive wisdom directly from Erda, Mother Earth. 

~ The Book of Goddesses: A Celebration of the Divine Feminine 

(Source: ifoundoutatzeropoint, via godmindlove)

"Silence is the language of God, all else is poor translation."
- Rumi (via lazyyogi)