If Andromeda were brighter, this is how it would look in our night sky. They’re all out there, we just can’t see them
Distance to Earth: 2,538,000 light years

If Andromeda were brighter, this is how it would look in our night sky.
They’re all out there, we just can’t see them

Distance to Earth: 2,538,000 light years

(Source: laughing-treees, via gabbari)

"Waking up to who you are requires letting go of who you imagine yourself to be."
- Alan Watts  (via wordsnquotes)
"Through our eyes, the universe is perceiving itself. Through our ears, the universe is listening to its harmonies. We are the witnesses through which the universe becomes conscious of its glory, of its magnificence."
- Alan Watts (via petrichour)

The Real You

wordsnquotes:

Alan Watts on waking up to the real you:

When you’re ready to wake up, you’re going to wake up, and if you’re not ready you’re going to stay pretending that you’re just a ‘poor little me.’ And since you’re all here and engaged in this sort of inquiry and listening to this sort of lecture, I assume you’re all in the process of waking up. Or else you’re teasing yourselves with some kind of flirtation with waking up which you’re not serious about. But I assume that maybe you are not serious, but sincere – that you are ready to wake up.

So then, when you’re in the way of waking up, and finding out who you really are, what you do is what the whole universe is doing a the place you call here and now. You are something that the whole universe is doing in the same way that a wave is something that the whole ocean is doing… The real you is not a puppet which life pushes around; the real, deep down you is the whole universe.

So then, when you die, you’re not going to have to put up with everlasting non-existance, because that’s not an experience. A lot of people are afraid that when they die, they’re going to be locked up in a dark room forever, and sort of undergo that. But one of the interesting things in the world is–this is a yoga, this is a realization–try and imagine what it will be like to go to sleep and never wake up. Think about that.

Children think about it. It’s one of the great wonders of life. What will it be like to go to sleep and never wake up? And if you think long enough about that, something will happen to you. You will find out, among other things, it will pose the next question to you. What was it like to wake up after having never gone to sleep? That was when you were born.

You see, you can’t have an experience of nothing; nature abhors a vacuum. So after you’re dead, the only thing that can happen is the same experience, or the same sort of experience as when you were born. In other words, we all know very well that after other people die, other people are born. And they’re all you, only you can only experience it one at a time. Everybody is I, you all know you’re you, and wheresoever beings exist throughout all galaxies, it doesn’t make any difference. You are all of them. And when they come into being, that’s you coming into being.

You know that very well, only you don’t have to remember the past in the same way you don’t have to think about how you work your thyroid gland, or whatever else it is in your organism. You don’t have to know how to shine the sun. You just do it, like you breath. Doesn’t it really astonish you that you are this fantastically complex thing, and that you’re doing all this and you never had any education in how to do it? Never learned, but you’re this miracle?

Note: Much of the above talk is included in a much more in-depth article by Alan Watts titled “The Nature of Consciousness.”

(Source: wordsnquotes)

word-stuck:

rasāsvāda रसास्वाद (rasa, “juice, essence”; āsvāda, “tasting, enjoying”)

word-stuck:

rasāsvāda रसास्वाद (rasa, “juice, essence”; āsvāda, “tasting, enjoying”)

femme-de-lettres asked:

Just for the record, the Regnault painting of Salomé is actually in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, not the Museum of Modern Art.

Sofia Awakens: Mary Magdalene and Divine Feminine Answer:

Yes! Thank you for the correction! Fixing now.

elyssediamond:

(click on the image to view in high resolution)Etude pour Salome/ Study for SalomeGustave MoreauLouvre Museum

elyssediamond:

(click on the image to view in high resolution)
Etude pour Salome/ Study for Salome
Gustave Moreau
Louvre Museum

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
This is Henri Regnault’s Salomé, from 1870.
Lovely as she is, intricate and shining and surprisingly close as the scene may be, the piece is surprisingly ordinary.
She’s Salome!
Shouldn’t there be dancing, and severed heads?
There’s a sly allusion in the blade and plate, but nothing approaching violence—or even motion, particularly—in the scene.
It can’t have been from any sense of delicacy on Regnault’s part: he painted a deeply gruesome beheading in full detail the very same year.
There is somewhat of a practical explanation in the Metropolitan Museum's comment that “Regnault initially represented this Italian model as an African woman, but later enlarged the canvas at the bottom and right and transformed it into a representation of Salomé.”
But why change an Orientalist genre scene into a depiction of Salomé?
To me, there’s actually a surprising tension to the work because of it. At some point recently, this somewhat static if mischievous-looking woman danced so beautifully that she found herself in a position to command a king.
At some point soon, we know, she will command that king to bring her a man’s head on the very plate she casually balances on her lap.
But for now, she lounges safely, smiling at the viewer like the subject of one of those ubiquitous 19th century paintings of some imaginary and ambiguously foreign harem.

This painting of Salome hangs in The Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan.  Many times when looking at this painting I find myself in it.

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

This is Henri Regnault’s Salomé, from 1870.

Lovely as she is, intricate and shining and surprisingly close as the scene may be, the piece is surprisingly ordinary.

She’s Salome!

Shouldn’t there be dancing, and severed heads?

There’s a sly allusion in the blade and plate, but nothing approaching violence—or even motion, particularly—in the scene.

It can’t have been from any sense of delicacy on Regnault’s part: he painted a deeply gruesome beheading in full detail the very same year.

There is somewhat of a practical explanation in the Metropolitan Museum's comment that “Regnault initially represented this Italian model as an African woman, but later enlarged the canvas at the bottom and right and transformed it into a representation of Salomé.”

But why change an Orientalist genre scene into a depiction of Salomé?

To me, there’s actually a surprising tension to the work because of it. At some point recently, this somewhat static if mischievous-looking woman danced so beautifully that she found herself in a position to command a king.

At some point soon, we know, she will command that king to bring her a man’s head on the very plate she casually balances on her lap.

But for now, she lounges safely, smiling at the viewer like the subject of one of those ubiquitous 19th century paintings of some imaginary and ambiguously foreign harem.

This painting of Salome hangs in The Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan.  Many times when looking at this painting I find myself in it.

salome sensual archetype dance

maertyrer:

Leon Herbo - Salome mit dem Kopf Johannes des Täufers (Salome with the head of John the Baptist, 1890)

Salome

maertyrer:

Leon Herbo - Salome mit dem Kopf Johannes des Täufers (Salome with the head of John the Baptist, 1890)

Salome